A Million BAM Worth Equipment for the TB Wards in BiH

06 Dec 2013

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Laboratory equipment for the diagnosis of tuberculosis worth over 1 million BAM, this week is delivered in 15 laboratories throughout Bosnia and Herzegovina. Procurement of equipment is financed from the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria, within the framework of the UNDP project Strengthening of the DOTS Strategy and Improving the National Tuberculosis Programme (NTP), including Multidrug Resistant and Infection Control in Bosnia and Herzegovina.

The new equipment will enable better and more efficient diagnosis, completion of the recommended measures for prevention and control of infection by the World Health Organization (WHO), with the aim of improving the quality of laboratory services to end users.

Today, the citizens of Bosnia and Herzegovina receive the same quality of services in the field of diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis, as citizens of member countries of the European Union. Since 2008, the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) improved operation of laboratories, provided additional training for laboratory staff and allow their work to be in line with international recommendations and standards of the European Union, thanks to the Global Fund.

The project Strengthening of the DOTS strategy and improving the National Tuberculosis Programme (NTP), including Multidrug Resistant and Infection Control in Bosnia and Herzegovina is conducted by Ministry of Civil Affairs of Bosnia and Herzegovina, Federal Ministry of Health, Ministry of Health and Social Protection RS and Department of Health and other services Brčko District, with the support of UNDP. The project is financed by the consolidated grant from the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria.

Related Project
Strengthening the DOTS Strategy and Improving the National Tuberculosis Programme (NTP), including Multidrug Resistant and Infection Control, in Bosnia and Herzegovina (BiH)

About one third of the world’s population is infected with tuberculosis (TB) bacteria, however only a small proportion of those infected will become sick with TB. Up to 20 million lives have been saved since 1995 through the DOTS (Directly Observed Treatment Short-course) and the Stop TB Strategies.